Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://192.168.194.112/handle/1/7075
Title: High Performance Work Practices: A Study of Hospital Human Resource Performance
Authors: Mankar, Dhananjay Deolal
Keywords: School of Health Systems Studies
Mariappan, M.
Work Practices
Issue Date: 2015
Abstract: High performance work practices are of key importance not only in strategic human resource management literature but also for the organizations that are striving for excellence in today's competitive markets. This research study highlights the contribution of high performance work practices to further the level of employee's attitude and behavior and organizational performance through developing high performance work practices in Indian Hospitals. These 'best practices' provide a source of competitive advantage if they are unique because of their historic time boundedness, rareness, and inimitability. The overall purpose of the present research was to identify the high performance work practices that have the potential not only to positively enhance employee's attitude and behavior but also positively affecting organizational performance and employee's productivity; in most cases employee's attitude and behavior mediate the relationship between high performance work practices and performance outcomes. The key objective and contribution of current study was to explore the impact of the moderating role of the resource base view on the relationship between high performance work practices and employee's attitude and behavior. The study was based on hospital employees; doctors and staff nurses. Convenient sampling technique was used to collect data from resident medical officers (doctors) and staff nurses of hospitals in Mumbai city. Survey Questionnaires were used to collect the responses; 200 questionnaires were sent to the hospital employees in the two respective hospitals of Mumbai that were reachable and selected for the research study. Out of the 200 questionnaires, 120 responses were received making a response rate of more than 60%. For the purpose of data validity, cronbach's alpha score was used. Data analysis was done with the help of Descriptive statistics and Bi-variate correlation analysis. Organizational performance is measured with: dimension of subjective performance based on different item used by past researchers. For testing the research questions i.e. the relationship between high performance work practices and organizational performance, and mediating role of HR outcomes, bi-variate correlation techniques were used. The same bi-variate correlation techniques were also used to study the mediation of HR outcomes i.e. employee's behavior and attitude on the relationship between high performance work practices and organizational performance and employee's productivity. Bi-variate correlation techniques were used to study the effect of the moderator (RBV) on the relationship between high performance work practices system and employee's attitude and behavior (HR Outcomes). Results indicate that high performance work practices have a positive and significant impact on organizational performance and employee's productivity. Results also establish the mediating role of HR outcome i.e. employee's attitude and behavior to further the level of organizational performance and employee's productivity. It is also proved that the view of hospital employees; doctors and staff nurses, about time boundedness, rareness, and inimitability of high performance work practices plays a moderating role to further the impact of high performance work practices. Overall, the high performance work practices were significantly related to the HR outcomes i.e. attitude and behavior, which, in turn, were significantly related to overall organizational performance and employee's productivity. The HR outcome i.e. attitude and behavior acted as mediators of the relationship between high performance work practices and organizational performance and employee's productivity. The relationships between high performance work practices i.e. selectivity in recruitment (SIR), information sharing (IS), self-managed team (SMT), reduced status distinctions and barriers (RSDB) and measurement of HR practices and attitude are clearly moderated by RBV. On the other hand, RBV has also moderated the relationships between behavior and following high performance practices, such as employment security (ES), employment ownership (EO), information sharing (IS), self-managed teams (SMT) and reduced status distinctions and barriers (RSDB). The current study contributes to Strategic HRM research, as it is an attempt to explore the relationship between high performance work practices and organizational performance and employee's productivity along with dimensions of employee attitude and behavior. For management, it provides guidance such as applying a combination of practices that not only directly affect productivity and performance but also develops positive attitude and behavior, which furthers the level of performance. Self-reported data cross and sectional analysis constitute limitations of the current study. Directions for future researches are also discussed i.e. in future researcher can include the objective data and should go for longitudinal study.
URI: http://192.168.194.112/handle/1/7075
Appears in Collections:M.Phil.

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01_Title.pdf67.73 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
02_Declaration.pdf22.97 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
03_Certificate.pdf22.84 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
04_Dedication.pdf33.07 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
05_Contents.pdf27.31 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
06_Acknowledgements.pdf32.63 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
07_Abstract.pdf31.93 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
08_List of Abbreviations.pdf22.81 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
09_List of Figures.pdf22.54 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
10_List of Tables.pdf28.86 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
11_Chapter1.pdf785.94 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
12_Chapter2.pdf89.61 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
13_Chapter3.pdf138.66 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
14_Chapter4.pdf92.13 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
15_Chapter5.pdf284.6 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
16_Chapter6.pdf62.28 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
17_Appendix.pdf2.1 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
18_References.pdf98.17 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


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