Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://192.168.194.112/handle/1/2490
Title: Explore the need for counselling in the Corporate Sector
Authors: Rana, Krishna
Keywords: Centre for Human Ecology
Sujata Sriram
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: TISS
Abstract: The research focused on understanding the awareness of counselling in the adults working in the corporate sector. Attitudes of the self and those of colleagues and the family towards counselling were also examined in the study. Data collection tools were a self-designed questionnaire along with a structured questionnaire to assess quality of working life. Data was obtained from 37 respondents (26 males, 11 females) in the age group of 24 –35 years, who were working in various companies in Mumbai. Analysis indicated that respondents perceived counselling to be helpful for young adults working i n the corporate sector; however, awareness about counselling was not high. Many respondents felt that professional training was necessary to become a counsellor. Friends were preferred for sharing personal problems. If there was a need for counselling, he lp would be sought from a counsellor in a private setting. Respondents felt that their colleagues/co-workers would be supportive if they had to go for counselling. Their decision to go for counselling would not be influenced by social factors. However, the re was the apprehension that their progress in the organization may be affected if the knowledge about them seeking counselling was made public. There was a stigma associated with seeking counselling support. The study revealed that most of the participant s had a good quality of life, and were content. They were in the process to attaining mastery at work and their fellowship was good. The study indicated the benefits of preventive counselling for individuals working in the corporate sector.
URI: http://192.168.194.112/handle/1/2490
Appears in Collections:M.A.

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